https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24977967A review of the literature indicates that significant progress has been made since Dr. Ethan B. Russo's landmark paper, just ten years ago (February 2, 2004). Investigation at that time suggested that cannabinoids can block spinal, peripheral and gastrointestional mechanisms that promote pain in headache, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and muscle spasm.

Subsequent research has confirmed that underlying endocannabinoid deficiencies indeed play a role in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and a growing list of other medical conditions. Clinical experience is bearing this out. Further research and especially, clinical trials will further demonstrate the usefulness of medical cannabis. As legal barriers fall and scientific bias fades this will become more apparent.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15159679This study examines the concept of clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD), and the prospect that it could underlie the pathophysiology of migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, and other functional conditions alleviated by clinical cannabis.


Migraine has numerous relationships to endocannabinoid function. Anandamide (AEA) potentiates 5-HT1A and inhibits 5-HT2A receptors supporting therapeutic efficacy in acute and preventive migraine treatment. Cannabinoids also demonstrate dopamine-blocking and anti-inflammatory effects. AEA is tonically active in the periaqueductal gray matter, a migraine generator. THC modulates glutamatergic neurotransmission via NMDA receptors. Fibromyalgia is now conceived as a central sensitization state with secondary hyperalgesia. Cannabinoids have similarly demonstrated the ability to block spinal, peripheral and gastrointestinal mechanisms that promote pain in headache, fibromyalgia, IBS and related disorders. The past and potential clinical utility of cannabis-based medicines in their treatment is discussed, as are further suggestions for experimental investigation of CECD via CSF examination and neuro-imaging.

Migraine, fibromyalgia, IBS and related conditions display common clinical, biochemical and pathophysiological patterns that suggest an underlying clinical endocannabinoid deficiency that may be suitably treated with cannabinoid medicines.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24662556Fibromyalgia often coexists and overlaps with other syndromes such as chronic fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis. Chronic stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these illnesses. The sympathetic nervous system is a key element of the stress response system. Sympathetic dysfunction has been reported in these syndromes, raising the possibility that such dysautonomia could be their common clustering underlying pathogenesis.  The objective of this study was to carry out a review of all published comparative case-control studies investigating sympathetic nervous system performance in fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis.

A total of 196 articles are included in this review. The most often used methods to assess sympathetic functionality were heart rate variability analysis, sympathetic skin response, tilt table testing, and genetic studies. The majority of studies (65%) described sympathetic nervous system predominance in these overlapping syndromes. In contrast, 7% of the studies found parasympathetic predominance

This review demonstrates that sympathetic nervous system predominance is common in fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis. This concordance raises the possibility that sympathetic dysfunction could be their common underlying pathogenesis that brings on overlapping clinical features. The recognition of sympathetic predominance in these 4 syndromes may have potential clinical implications. It may be worth exploring the use of nonpharmacological measures as well as drug therapies aimed to regain autonomic balance.


Cannabis -vs- IBS

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