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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18426503:   In mammals, including humans, bone metabolism is manifested as an ongoing modelling/remodelling process whereby the bone mineralised matrix is being continuously renewed. Recently, the main components of the endocannabinoid system have been reported in the skeleton. Osteoblasts, the bone forming cells, and other cells of the osteoblastic lineage, as well as osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells, and their precursors, synthesise the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). CB(1) cannabinoid receptors are present in sympathetic nerve terminals in close proximity to osteoblasts. Activation of these CB(1) receptors by elevated bone 2-AG levels communicates brain-to-bone signals as exemplified by traumatic brain injury-induced stimulation of bone formation. In this process, the retrograde CB(1) signalling inhibits noradrenaline release and alleviates the tonic sympathetic restrain of bone formation. CB(2) receptors are expressed by osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Their activation stimulates bone formation and suppresses bone resorption. CB(2)-deficient mice display a markedly accelerated age-related bone loss. Ovariectomy-induced bone loss can be both prevented and rescued by a CB(2) specific agonist. Hence, synthetic CB(2) ligands, which are stable and orally available, provide a basis for developing novel anti-osteoporotic therapies, free of psychotropic effects. The CNR2 gene (encoding CB(2)) in women is associated with low bone mineral density, offering an assay for identifying females at risk of developing osteoporosis.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17646266:   Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system, its presence and involvement have been reported in a handful of biological systems. Recently, the skeleton has been identified as a major endocannabinoid target through both the neuronal CB1 and predominantly peripheral CB2 cannabinoid receptors. CB1 is present in sympathetic nerve terminals in bone, whereas CB2 is expressed in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, the respective bone-forming and -resorbing cells. Furthermore, the skeleton appears as the main system physiologically regulated by CB2. CB2-deficient mice show a markedly accelerated age-related bone loss and the CB2 locus in women is associated with low bone density and osteoporotic fractures. Since activation of CB2 attenuates experimentally induced bone loss by inhibiting bone resorption and stimulating bone formation, and because synthetic cannabinoids are stable and orally available, a therapy based on synthetic CB2 agonists is a promising novel target for antiosteoporotic drug development.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18071301 A functional endocannabinoid system is present in several mammalian organs and tissues. Recently, endocannabinoids and their receptors have been reported in the skeleton. Osteoblasts, the bone forming cells, and osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells, produce the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol and express CB2 cannabinoid receptors. Although CB2 has been implicated in pathological processes in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, the skeleton appears as the main system physiologically regulated by CB2. CB2-deficient mice show a markedly accelerated age-related bone loss and the CNR2 gene (encoding CB2) in women is associated with low bone mineral density. The activation of CB2 attenuates ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice by restraining bone resorption and enhancing bone formation. Hence synthetic CB2 ligands, which are stable and orally available, provide a basis for developing novel anti-osteoporotic therapies. Activation of CB1 in sympathetic nerve terminals in bone inhibits norepinephrine release, thus balancing the tonic sympathetic restrain of bone formation. Low levels of CB1 were also reported in osteoclasts. CB1-null mice display a skeletal phenotype that is dependent on the mouse strain, gender and specific mutation of the CB1 encoding gene, CNR1.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19634029The active component of marijuana, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, activates the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, thus mimicking the action of endogenous cannabinoids. CB1 is predominantly neuronal and mediates the cannabinoid psychotropic effects. CB2 is predominantly expressed in peripheral tissues, mainly in pathological conditions. So far the main endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, have been found in bone at 'brain' levels. The CB1 receptor is present mainly in skeletal sympathetic nerve terminals, thus regulating the adrenergic tonic restrain of bone formation. CB2 is expressed in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, stimulates bone formation, and inhibits bone resorption. Because low bone mass is the only spontaneous phenotype so far reported in CB2 mutant mice, it appears that the main physiologic involvement of CB2 is associated with maintaining bone remodeling at balance, thus protecting the skeleton against age-related bone loss. Indeed, in humans, polymorphisms in CNR2, the gene encoding CB2, are strongly associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Preclinical studies have shown that a synthetic CB2-specific agonist rescues ovariectomy-induced bone loss. Taken together, the reports on cannabinoid receptors in mice and humans pave the way for the development of 1) diagnostic measures to identify osteoporosis-susceptible polymorphisms in CNR2, and 2) cannabinoid drugs to combat osteoporosis.