​​​​​​cannabis data.org

Cannabis -vs- Shingles

​https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19789075:  Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3931201Cannabis sativus - the powder of the leaves serves as a dressing for wounds and sores. Ganja is externally applied to relieve pain in itchy skin diseases. Hemp seed oil is useful for treatment of eczema and host of other skin diseases like dermatitis, seborrhoeic dermatitis/cradle cap, varicose eczema, psoriasis, lichen planus and acne roseacea. By using hemp seed oil, the skin is strengthened and made better able to resist bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Crushed leaves are rubbed on the affected areas to control scabies.[16]


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25635955 Electronic database searches were performed using Medline, PubMed, Embase, all evidence-based medicine reviews, and Web of Science, through communication with the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids (CCIC), and by searching printed indices from 1950. Terms used were marijuana, marihuana, cannabis, cannabinoids, nabilone, delta- 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, ajulemic acid, dronabinol, pain, chronic, disease, and neuropathic. Randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) involving cannabis and cannabinoids for the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain were selected. Outcomes considered were reduction in pain intensity and adverse events.

Of the 24 studies that examined chronic neuropathic pain, 11 studies were excluded. The 13 included studies were rated using the Jadad Scale to measure bias in pain research. Evaluation of these studies suggested that cannabinoids may provide effective analgesia in chronic neuropathic pain conditions that are refractory to other treatments.